Pozo Stampede 2017 – Tickets – Pozo Saloon – Pozo, CA – April 29th, 2017

Pozo Stampede 2017

LBP & 805 Beer Presents

Pozo Stampede 2017

Alabama, Randy Houser, Tyler Farr, Dan + Shay, David Nail, Randy Rogers Band, Cam, William Michael Morgan, Jade Jackson, The Gospel Whiskey Runers, JD Hardy, Ellee Duke, Kalie Shorr

Sat, April 29, 2017 - Sun, April 30, 2017

11:00 am

Pozo Saloon

Pozo, CA

$39.50 - $250

This event is all ages

Camping opens at 8am on Saturday, April 29th and closes at 8am on Monday, May 2nd.

 

Saturday 4/29 Lineup*: Randy Houser, Tyler Farr, David Nail, Cam, The Gospel Whiskey Runners

Sunday 4/30 Lineup*:  Alabama, Dan + Shay, Randy Rogers Band, William Michael Morgan, Jade Jackson, JD Hardy

 

*Daily lineups subject to change without notice

Pozo Stampede
Pozo Stampede
Alabama
Alabama
From humble beginnings to international stardom and induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame, Alabama changed the face and sound of country music. With over 43 #1 singles to their credit, including 21 consecutive #1 singles, Alabama has sold over 73 million records. They have won over 170 major awards, ranging from CMAs and ACMs to American Music Awards and Grammys.
Randy Houser
Randy Houser
Randy Houser is a man refreshed. “I don’t know how it happened, but everything in my life has started lining up,” says the Lake, Mississippi native. “I must have done somebody right in the past.”

Those positive vibes of renewal ripple through Houser’s three consecutive No. 1 hits, “How Country Feels,” “Runnin’ Outta Moonlight” and “Goodnight Kiss,” which was Houser’s first No. 1 as a songwriter though he has written numerous hits for artists over the years. “How Country Feels” was his first-ever No. 1 at radio, and both it and “Runnin’ Outta Moonlight” earned RIAA Platinum certifications. “Like A Cowboy” was a Top 5 smash and earned Houser rave reviews for his “pure, unencumbered vocal showcase” (Taste of Country). All four songs are from Houser’s Stoney Creek Records debut, How Country Feels, released in early 2013.

Houser cut How Country Feels with producer Derek George, a long-time friend and fellow Mississippian he had wanted to work with for over a decade. It’s been called “a buoyant, hook-filled outing” (Washington Post) that’s infused with “a balance of revelry and introspection” (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel) and shows off Randy’s powerhouse voice, hailed “one of the best in Nashville” by Great American Country (GAC) and numerous other critics.

Houser’s past contains no shortage of achievement, as it includes multiple nominations for ACM and CMA Awards, a No. 2 single in the form of “Boots On,” and songwriting credits for major names such as Trace Adkins, Justin Moore and Chris Young. In 2008—mere months after the release of his debut single, “Anything Goes”—Houser was even asked by David Letterman himself to appear on The Late Show. The singer’s first full-length album, Anything Goes, came out later that year, followed in 2010 by They Call Me Cadillac which spawned hit “Whistlin’ Dixie,” and fan-favorite “A Man Like Me.”

But despite this early success, Houser now admits that he wasn’t truly happy. “It seemed like professionally things weren’t as great as they could be, and that was part of it,” he says. “But the biggest thing was not having a home base.” Shortly after, Houser signed with new label home Stoney Creek Records based in Nashville, Tenn.

“Everybody there feels like part of my family,” Houser says of the independent imprint, where he happily signed following a long stretch of intensive touring. (How intensive? Think 150 shows a year.) “You walk in the door and everybody seems really happy with their job; there’s no strife in the air. That’s really important for me to have right now. It’s comforting.”

New tracks on How Country Feels echo the title single’s sunny self-assurance, including “Growin’ Younger” and “Along for the Ride,” which Houser co- wrote with Zac Brown. “We were playing a festival and I just had this song rolling around in my head,” Houser remembers of the latter. “I stayed up till about 5 in the morning but then got stuck. So I called up Zac and we went on his bus and knocked it out of the park.”

There is contemplation, too: “Like a Cowboy” is about “me coming home for a few days, then having to leave again,” Houser says. “Route 3 Box 250D” provides an intimate snapshot of the singer’s upbringing. “That one’s kind of hard to listen to,” he admits. “It hits almost too close to home.” Billboard calls the song “stunning,” and The New York Times writes, “His voice here is almost wholly different, thicker and more throbbing, a caldron bubbling over. For a few minutes he’s the singer Nashville won’t let him be.”

As for the sound of How Country Feels, Houser says it’s his most expansive outing yet, with more bells and whistles than he’s used in the past; it also showcases the remarkable voice that led Vince Gill to call Houser “one of the best in the new crop of country singer-songwriters” and pal Jamey Johnson to say, “I watched a blind man jump to his feet and drop his crutches the first time he heard Randy Houser sing.”

And since the release of How Country Feels, critics have echoed those claims in reviews, with MSN writing “Houser is hands down one of the best male vocalists in Nashville,” and quoting Dierks Bentley as saying, “It’s kind of ridiculous how good of a singer he is.”

Now, armed with “one of country’s biggest voices” (Rolling Stone Country) and propelled by the momentum of How Country Feels, Houser continues his story with “We Went,” a “galloping road anthem that builds on the dusty vibe of ‘Like a Cowboy’” (Rolling Stone Country). The song is just the first taste of a forthcoming album from Houser, who is eager to share music he calls “more progressive than I’ve ever done.”
Tyler Farr
Tyler Farr
Columbia Nashville’s Tyler Farr releases his highly anticipated sophomore album, Suffer In Peace, on April 28th. Suffer In Peace made its debut in the top 5 on the BILLBOARD Top 200 Albums and BILLBOARD Country Albums Charts. Previously with the release of his debut album, Redneck Crazy, which released in 2013, landing Farr at No. 2 on the Billboard Country Albums Chart and #5 on the Billboard Top 200 made Farr the only solo male country artist in the last 10 years to have his first two studio albums debut in the top-5 on the Billboard 200 Chart. His #1, platinum-selling title-track “Redneck Crazy” was called the “song of the summer” by The New York Times and projected Farr forward to celebrate back-to-back #1 singles, including his first #1 as a songwriter, with his Gold-certified hit “Whiskey in my Water.” The Missouri native’s dry wit and energetic live show have earned him industry recognition as a 2014 CRS New Faces of Country Radio and 2014 Music Row “Breakthrough Artist of the Year” nominee, as well as rave reviews for his coveted opening slots touring with Jason Aldean, Florida Georgia Line, Brantley Gilbert and Lee Brice. Tyler has appeared on the Today Show and Fox & Friend’s All American Summer Concert Series. Tyler’s first single off the newly released Suffer In Peace album, “A Guy Walks into a Bar,” is proving to be Farr's third radio hit, currently residing in the Top 5 at country radio, and is now RIAA Certified GOLD
Dan + Shay
Dan + Shay
Critically acclaimed duo Dan + Shay (Dan Smyers and Shay Mooney) hit No. 1 on Billboard's Country Albums Chart with their first album Where It All Began, which was released in 2014. Racking up more than 25 million YouTube views, they are the only new country duo in SoundScan recorded history to debut at No. 1. Additionally, the pair has impressively sold over 1.5 million digital tracks and over 372,000 album equivalents to date, which includes 117 million streams. Their latest single "Nothin' Like You" hit No. 1 at Country radio, while their debut single "19 You + Me" is certified Gold by the RIAA selling over 774,000 downloads. Dan + Shay have been nominated for both CMA and ACM's "Vocal Duo of the Year" for two years in a row, and were previously nominated for a CMT Music Video Award. Dan + Shay finished up 2015 with their headlining "Just the Right Kind of Crazy" Tour. For more information please visit DanAndShay.com and follow @DanandShay on Twitter and Instagram.
David Nail
David Nail
Since his debut in 2009, David Nail has made a career of singing songs that few artists dare touch in contemporary country music: sad songs. He has had hits with singles about cheating ("Let It Rain"), breakups ("Red Light") and failed dreams ("Turning Home") and he has owned every one, singing as if from personal experience.

David's ability to make such tales of heartbreak and loss his own is what defines him as an artist—one capable of finding and recording songs that are deeply relatable to him and to listeners. And his cathartic new album continues that trend, albeit with a series of decidedly upbeat songs that reflects David's own happiness.

But the Grammy-nominated artist's renewed personal life did not come easily.

After scoring his first No. 1 single with "Let It Rain" from 2011's critically lauded The Sound of a Million Dreams, the bourbon-smooth singer spent an inordinate amount of time on tour, giving his entire being to country fans. He nearly burned himself out in the process, landing in a funk from which he found it difficult to emerge.

But David prevailed, and he credits his revitalization to his wife Catherine. "I have this newfound happiness, energy and enthusiasm about life," he says. "And the sole inspiration for why I wanted to get better, to change and to be different was because of her."

Now, David has taken that refreshed mindset and used it to shape his trail-blazing third album. If 2009's I'm About to Come Alive was a snapshot of David grasping for the stars and The Sound of a Million Dreamscaptured him struggling with success, then this new album reflects an artist in control of his craft, a man fulfilled.

The album's 11 tracks, four of which were written by the Missouri native, capture, for the first time, the energy of his live performance. "It is a much more upbeat album than I've done in the past," he says. "Having spent so much time on the road, I think I have a better idea of the type of songs people gravitate toward in a live setting."

But turning in a more up-tempo album after a career of sober material is a challenge, as well as a departure that could take longtime fans by surprise.

"I think my records have been very much who I was at that place and time, and I think people can say, 'Man, you sing all these sad songs and there is a lot of heartache,'" David admits. "But this album came out of a pure place of doing something that we simply enjoy."

David cites the spontaneous nature of cuts like the album's lead single, "Whatever She's Got," a favorite of wife Catherine.

"I always believed the song was special, but when my wife first heard it, I watched her start to dance and move around. I thought to myself, 'I've never seen my wife move like that before.' I instantly knew we had something with 'Whatever She's Got,'" he says.

Indeed, it's hard to sit still when listening to the breezy jam, perhaps the hookiest love song to be recorded in the past 10 years. "From the first moment I heard it, I thought this would sound amazing on radio," David says. "It has a melody that you can't get out of your head."

Tracks like "Broke My Heart," "Burnin' Bed" and "Lyle County" are similarly infectious, all with deliberate grooves that carry the listener along. "Broke My Heart" has the vibe of a Tom Petty song, "Burnin' Bed" features a unique staccato delivery from David in its verses, and "Lyle County" boasts sublime harmonies from special guests Little Big Town.

"Lyle County" is full of the nostalgic imagery at which David excels. "I thought I was finished with the idea of reflecting on life's glory days, but there's something very beautiful and pure about those times. I'm a sucker for those types of songs," he laughs.

Interestingly, while The Sound of a Million Dreams featured a prominent piano sound, and the new recording contains few ivory notes. It's very much a guitar record with, naturally for David, an emphasis on vocals. The ACM Award-nominated singer's voice is without peer. To some, he is country music's Adele, and even covered the British chanteuse's "Someone Like You" on his 1979 EP to mainstream praise.

But while David may have eschewed the piano ballads of influences like Elton John on Album Title TBD, he did make a point to pay tribute to one of his heroes, Glen Campbell. He closes out the album with his version of Campbell's classic "Galveston," with help from Lee Ann Womack, who also appeared on The Sound of a Million Dreams.

Like much of Album Titled TBD, produced by David's faithful collaborator Frank Liddell, the inclusion of "Galveston" was born out of spontaneity. "It was very spur of the moment," David says. "While it was important to me to pay respect to the song, I wanted to do it how I would do it. And I wanted Lee Ann to be a part of it."

In the end, however, it's the track "I'm a Fire" that may best define the album and David's view on where he is in his personal life.

"There's so many moments on this record that make me think about the last four years that I've been married, and 'I'm a Fire' just sums it all up," David says. "It says, 'I've walked through flames, come out on the other end, and the foremost reason is because of you.'"

It's a heavy statement, one that carries the weight of not only a romance, but of a career. But for David Nail, an artist who wears emotion as a badge of honor, that's the only kind of statement he can make. And he declares it loud and clear on Album Title TDD.

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Randy Rogers Band
Randy Rogers Band
Authenticity isn't something that can be manufactured in a studio. It's not a craft that can be learned or artfully practiced. It comes from living life. It's the byproduct of blood, sweat and tears and as the foundation for music, it elevates mere entertainment to compelling art. Every note, every word on the Randy Rogers Band's new album Nothing Shines Like Neon rings with authenticity that makes each song linger with the listener long after the music fades.

"You've just got to be true to yourself and you can't fool anybody," Rogers states matter of factly of the band's philosophy. "As a whole, our body of work is pretty consistent to our live show and the band that plays on the record is the band that you go see."

The same line up has been performing together since 2002 and the music has evolved as they've soaked up life experience. "As men we've all matured and lived a lot of life together," Rogers says. "We've had a few breakups happen to us. We've had babies. We've had life changes. We've been on the road 200 shows a year. I've been in this band 15 years so a lot has changed. I still listen to Merle Haggard every night. I mean that hasn't changed, but a lot has changed for us musically and privately. We all are in a good spot and we all are just as good friends as when we started."

Camaraderie and creativity have made Rogers and bandmates Geoffrey Hill (guitar), Johnny "Chops" Richardson (bass guitar), Brady Black (fiddle), Les Lawless (drums) and Todd Stewart (utility player) one of the top bands on the competitive Texas music scene. Nothing Shines Like Neon continues the momentum established by the band's four previous albums—Randy Rogers Band, Burning the Day, Trouble and Homemade Tamales, each of which went to No. 1 on iTunes. Earlier in 2015, Rogers joined friend Wade Bowen to record the critically acclaimed album Hold My Beer Vol. 1.

Produced by Nashville legend Buddy Cannon (Willie/Merle) at Cedar Creek in Austin, RRB's news album Nothing Shines Like Neon showcases the band's taut musicianship as well as Rogers' earnest vocals and insightful songwriting on such instant classics as the groove laden "Rain and the Radio," the heartbreak anthem "Neon Blues" and the playful "Actin' Crazy," a duet with Jamey Johnson. "Jamey and I wrote that song together," Rogers notes. "I met a movie star a few days before Jamey and I were going to write. I was in LA playing at the House of Blues and he came out to the show. I was thinking about him …and thinking about being a struggling actor living in LA and having to put up with all the bullshit that LA is. I just wrote that song about him."

The album opens with the fiddle driven shuffle "San Antone". "That is a Keith Gattis song. He wrote by himself. Being from Texas and living so close to San Antonio, I don't think that song is going to hurt me at all," Rogers laughs. "It's one of those songs when I heard it I was like, 'Oh hell! Why didn't I write this song?'"

"Takin' It As It Comes" features Lone Star legend Jerry Jeff Walker. "I've been a big fan of Jerry Jeff's all my life," Rogers says. "He came in the studio with us, got in there with the band, jumped around and played guitar and sang. We had a great time."

"Rain and the Radio" is Rogers' homage to Ronnie Milsap. "I wrote that with Sean McConnell. He and I have written a lot of songs through the years. I've always been a huge Ronnie Milsap fan and to me that song has a little Milsap feel to it, kind of a bluesy country thing, which we haven't done before. Any artist that I look up to always tries to create something different and pushes the envelope a little bit. I think we do with that song in particular. It's very country. It's just very different. As a band, we're trying to broaden our horizons and I don't think that's a bad thing. If we were all just stuck doing the same old thing, we would all be bored. We probably wouldn't still be here. It's just a matter of spreading your wings a little bit."

"Look Out Yonder" is a poignant tune Rogers recorded in honor of his mentor, the late Kent Finlay. "Kent gave me my start in the music business. Up until the day that he died, we talked about songs and about music," Rogers says. "We actually named the record, Nothing Shines Like Neon after a lyric in one of his songs as a tribute to him. Alison Krauss and Dan Tyminski are singing on 'Look Out Yonder', which was written by Earl Bud Lee, who is most famous for writing 'Friends In Low Places'. He and I have been friends for 10 years and he has always wanted me to cut that song. I've never had a record where it fit and just thinking about losing Kent and Kent going to heaven and joining his mom, 'Look out yonder coming down the road' it just fit. I haven't performed that song yet live, but I know I'm going to have a hard time getting through it. The day we started our record, I got a call that Kent passed away so this record is definitely dedicated to Kent. That song makes me think about all of us musicians and how we are crazy as hell and lead the most unorthodox lives. Most of us return back to our roots, so hopefully this is an album that glorifies Kent's life and is also a nod to the traditional sounds that we all grew up loving."

A native of Cleburne, Texas, Rogers grew up addicted to traditional country music. "I wanted to be George Strait when I was in the sixth grade," he says with a smile. "And I grew up listening to Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, I've listened to them more than anybody else, my whole life. I always liked songs. I always wanted to find out who wrote the songs and what the songs were about. I always liked the art and the craft of being a songwriter. My dad's Beatles records got played a lot and Michael Martin Murphy is another one I listened to a lot as a kid. My dad was a huge fan."

Like many artists, Rogers got his start performing in church and then expanded to local venues. "I could write a song when I was pretty little, 11, 12 or 13," he says. "It's like a kid who could do calculus or something. It was just something that clicked in my brain for me. I went and finished college and got a degree in public relations and then started a band."
Since then the Randy Rogers Band has steadily built a following that has spilled beyond their native Texas. For the past 10 years they've recorded for Universal Music Group, but on Nothing Shines Like Neon, Rogers again takes the reins, releasing the album on his own Tommy Jackson Records, named after a song he wrote for their very first album. "It's a very obscure Randy Rogers Band song and to this day there is always this one drunk kid at a show that says, 'Play "Tommy Jackson!" Play "Tommy Jackson!"' It's kind of a running joke within our band. It's like, 'How in the hell did this kid in Iowa City, Iowa remember that stupid song "Tommy Jackson?"' It's about a guy who is on the run from the cops, wanted for murder. It's a story song and we just felt like it was a unique way to name a record label."

Nothing Shines Like Neon is a stellar collection in an already impressive body of recorded material that owes a lot to the band's potent live show. "You come to a show, you know what you're going to get," Rogers says. "We've worked hard at making ourselves better on stage and we care about our live show. It's a way to come out and unwind, and we've stuck to writing songs that are about real life, about breakups or divorces, falling in love or babies being born, and in the case of this record even death, the ups and downs of life. People can relate. That's what country music is supposed to be. Our band has been around for a long time because there's no bullshit to us. We're not in it to be rich and famous. We're in it to make a living, provide for our families and do something that we all love. You can't fool people and we haven't ever tried. I think that's the key."
Cam
Cam
A fresh and heartfelt new force in country music that feels like home and sounds like the truth. Cam's country roots trace back to her grandparents ranch in Southern California: picture palm trees, horses, a blue barn and a tractor named Big Red. Her storyteller lyrics walk a romantic line between worldly wisdom and Disney charm, and judging by her fan base this sort of thing appeals to all of us. She writes music that exudes absolute comfort and trust in her own tastes. She is not afraid. Cam is the new kind of cool.

Cam is currently working with Grammy Award winning producer Jeff Bhasker (Beyonce, FUN., Bruno Mars, The Rolling Stones), & Tyler Sam Johnson (OneRepublic, Taylor Swift, P!NK!). Her recent songwriting cuts include Miley Cyrus' "Maybe You're Right" (Miley Cyrus Bangerz, 2013) & "Fall Madly In Love With You" (Maggie Rose Cut to Impress, 2013). People with ears and hearts, take heed! Cam's got something for both. Her new single, Down This Road, is now available on iTunes!
William Michael Morgan
William Michael Morgan
The tall, easy-going, unfailingly polite 22-year-old from Vicksburg, Mississippi, has the look you'd hope for in a young entertainer and the stature to wear a black cowboy hat, a symbol that stands for something in the country music world. And he's certainly got the chops as an award-winning young performer, who earned recording and publishing deals before turning 20. But for Hendricks, it all comes down to that voice.

"William Michael Morgan is seriously one of the very best singers I have ever recorded and I have recorded a bunch," Hendricks said. "Recording a voice typically reveals any and all imperfections. I will never forget the first time we went into the studio and heard William Michael's voice come across the speakers. It was a jaw-dropping experience. I'm anxious for the world to hear what I heard. It truly is a special voice."

Country fans will get their introduction to Morgan with "I Met a Girl," his sweetly romantic debut single. Old and new, fast and slow, steel and piano, the song will give fans exact GPS coordinates of where Morgan is coming from.

"I like to sing about love. I'm a lover, not a fighter," Morgan says with a Mississippi lilt in his voice. "I like to write about having a good time. I'm a typical 22 year old."

Well, not really. Most folks are still trying to figure themselves out at 22. Morgan knew where he was going from an early age and his parents were always there for him. In the ninth grade, Morgan put together a band of middle-aged musicians who shared his love of Keith Whitley, Merle Haggard and George Jones.

"We didn't really have much of a name for the band, we just loved to get together and play," Morgan said. "The great thing about finding those guys who were older than me is they all loved the same kind of music I did and we just blended so well. I was lucky enough to have a steel guitar player all those years, and I just fell in love with that sound."

The no-name band played honky tonks on the weekends while Morgan worked odd jobs – he was a roofer, a cashier at the Piggly Wiggly – during the week. He began traveling back and forth to Nashville to write by the time he was 16. Morgan moved to town permanently when he was 18.

"Honestly, I didn't know how to wash my clothes," Morgan said. He didn't have any money to plug into the coin slot anyway. But contacts he built with Managers Joe Carter and Mike Taliaferro along with producer Jimmy Ritchey quickly paid off when he signed a record deal with Warner Music Nashville and a publishing deal with Warner/Chappell at 19.

These developments exposed him to Music Row, where he learned to expand his musical repertoire and education. He still keeps his ear out for those special songs like the ones by his musical heroes, though, and thinks he's found one in "I Met a Girl," co-produced by Hendricks and Ritchey and co-written by Shane McAnally, Trevor Rosen and Sam Hunt. It's the kind of song that goes perfectly with that timeless voice of Morgan's.

"That was the thing about those older songs by Haggard and Jones: they had those lyrics that really, really hit home. Whether it be a fun up-tempo 'Working Man Blues' kind of song or 'The Cold, Hard Truth.' Each lyric just hits you at home. I think that's what I try to do. Whether it be happy or sad, I try to put the most heart into I can."
Jade Jackson
Jade Jackson is a young singer-songwriter from a small town in central California with a talent for conveying an emotional intensity well beyond her years. With parents who abstained from the modern distractions of computers and television, and a local downtown boasting less than a block of stores, Jackson's childhood fascination focused solely on her father's record collection. Inspired by the music of Johnny Cash, George Jones and Hank Williams, she picked up a guitar and began writing songs at 13. By the time she was 14 Jackson was already performing live. While in her teens, she found influence in the evocative sounds of The Cure, The Gun Club, Echo and the Bunnymen and The Smiths. The otherwise cheerful teenager was soon attracting a local fan-base with a sad and immensely beautiful sound. "I just really love sad songs," Jackson says. "I've always been a happy person. Maybe it's because I get it out in my music. And it probably has to do with all of the Hank Williams I listened to growing up."

Waiting tables at the family restaurant, Jackson was able to self record two albums worth of material while still a teenager. Upon attending the prestigious Cal Arts college outside of Los Angeles, her sphere of influence was exponentially expanded to include the sounds of Tom Waits, Bob Dylan and Emmylou Harris, acclaimed songwriter Jason Isbell (Drive By Truckers), classic cowpunks Tex & the Horseheads, Mazzy Star and California punk rock and rollers Social Distortion. When it came time to form a band, Jackson chose to enlist a cadre of talented musicians she knew from back home on the Central Coast. The lineup includes guitarist Andrew Rebel, bassist Jake Vukovich and drummer Tyler Miller. "This is a real band," she declares. "And they're also my best friends." Jackson has so far shared stages with such prominent artists as Merle Haggard, Rosie Flores, Dwight Yokam, The White Buffalo, Phil Vassar and others. The group is soon to be in the studio recording with Mike Ness of Social Distortion serving as producer. Ness calls Jackson "a twenty-three year old with the voice of an old soul" and "one of the most prolific songwriters I've met" before adding, "When I first heard the songs she recorded I told myself, I have to be involved with this!"
The Gospel Whiskey Runers
The Gospel Whiskey Runers
Our goal has been to bring our hope-filled songs to those who are stuck in the darkest places in this world. We've sung in bars, churches, night clubs, street corners, and homeless shelters. Playing music for people at all of these venues has opened up conversations about the songs we sing and why we sing them. We would like to let the music continue to be a means of filling ears and hearts with the sweet news of hope.
JD Hardy
JD Hardy
It's been 40 years since Lynyrd Skynyrd Sang "Sweet Home Alabama", it’s been over 60 years since the Godfather of Country Music, Hank Williams was found dead in the back of a Cadillac caused by an overdose of drugs and alcohol. Hank single handedly changed the face of music by combining mountain music and blues, creating Country Music . He blazed the trail for many country music artists as well as being a direct influence to the many great sounds that came from Sun Records. In July 1954 Elvis Presley cut a two sided record, “That’s Alright Mama” and “Blue Moon of Kentucky” a new blend of country rhythm & blues we know as “Rockabilly”! If you believe that trends in music reoccur in cycles, were long overdue for a revival. In the tradition of Lynrd Skynyrd, Hank Williams, Elvis Presley and all other artist who were inspired by them to make their own kind of music we bring you JD Hardy.

JD's first single is about danger, demons, chasing dreams and ridin’ bulls. JD hails from Bakersfield, California with influences from hometown heroes, Merle Haggard and Buck Owens. JD currently lives in Arroyo Grande, California and is a huge PBR fan and has ridden a bull but decided it wasn’t for him. JD says, he respects bull riders and can identify with them in that “Everyone has that bull in their life trying to buck em‘ off their dream“. JD loves hanging out on a ranch and doing “cowboy things” he said you know, riding horses, roping cattle, barbequing, shooting guns and fishing.

JD Hardy has a code he lives by, "Work Hard and Play Hard!" He approaches everything like this and it shows in his unique writing style, his work in the studio and the high energy performances he gives on stage. JD was quoted saying, “next to the ranch his second home is at the front of a stage” So people get ready there’s a train a coming and his name is JD Hardy……
Venue Information:
Pozo Saloon
90 W. Pozo Rd.
Pozo, CA
http://www.pozosaloon.com/